Beautiful New Posters for the Universal Monsters

Seven of the “Universal Monsters” (Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, Bride of Frankenstein, The Wolf Man, Creature from the Black Lagoon) are celebrated in these exquisitely soulful and gothic posters by artist Nicolas Delort. You can buy the collection here.

Dracula PosterDracula (1931) Continue reading

Advertisements

Gothic Minimalism: Your Thoughts

I was pleasantly surprised by the thoughtful and in-depth comments left on a post I published last week (Gothic Minimalism: An Oxymoron?). I asked if Gothicism and Minimalism, two seemingly incompatible aesthetics, could be reconciled—and the answer seemed to be an enthusiastic yes!

Some of you gave suggestions of artists who you thought embodied a minimalist Gothic aesthetic. I thought I’d look into your recommendations and highlight them here:

Amenra

Continue reading

Gothic Films in the Criterion Collection

The Criterion Collection was founded to distribute “important classic and contemporary films.” So which Gothic films has the prestigious distributer deemed “important”? Let’s take a look at some of the Gothically-leaning films in the Collection (and also admire the awesome DVD cover art that’s created for each film). You’ll be pleasantly surprised to learn that there are actually quite a few of these films– so many that I only have room to feature films from the first halve of the 20th Century (next half will come later). Enjoy!

The Phantom Carriage, 1921. Dir. Victor Sjöström (Sweden).

CCPhantom Carriage

The last person to die on New Year’s Eve before the clock strikes twelve is doomed to take the reins of Death’s chariot and work tirelessly collecting fresh souls for the next year. Continue reading

Witches and wicked bodies

Witches Engraving

Agostino Veneziano, The Witches’ Rout (The Carcass). Engraving, c. 1520.

As much as it pains me to write about all of these amazing gothically-tinged exhibits opening in the UK, I have to share this one. From the British Museum’s event page:

“This exhibition will examine the portrayal of witches and witchcraft in art from the Renaissance to the end of the 19th century… Efforts to understand and interpret seemingly malevolent deeds – as well apportion blame for them and elicit confessions through hideous acts of torture – have had a place in society since classical antiquity and Biblical times. … The majority of those accused and punished for witchcraft, especially since the Reformation, have been women. They are shown as monstrous hags with devil-worshipping followers. They represent an inversion of a well-ordered society and the natural world.

Ooooh. Find out more about the exhibit, which runs until January 11, here.